Multiple Ordering How To

The holidays are hard enough as it is – why not make it just a little easier? Get all your holiday ordering done at once, by sending your packages through Thanksgiving Coffee! Check out just how easy it can be this year:

It’s easy as one, two, three! Check out the steps below to see how easy it is to order coffee for everyone on your holiday gift giving list:

Choose Your Coffee

Which coffee do you want to send to your sister? What about your uncle? Pick out the coffees for each of your recipients – step one complete! In the video above, we suggested our recently launched Holiday Blend – a lovely choice for this season.

Choose Your Grind

Your aunt and uncle might like to grind their beans themselves, but you know your sister doesn’t have a grinder. Adjust the grind for each individual order in the dropdown just above PRICE on each page!

Choose Your Quantity

Simply pick out how many bags you’d like to send to each individual. One? Two? Three? Just how generous are you feeling this year? Change this number just to the left of the ADD TO CART button.

Click the Ship To Dropdown

On every product on our website, you can click the dropdown just to the right of SHIP TO, and adjust who this coffee is going to! When you’ve chosen two bags of the Holiday Blend in Espresso Grind, simply click that dropdown and choose SOMEONE ELSE. A window will pop up, asking you to choose a nickname for this person, for your account!

Do this for each person on your holiday list. Parents, grandparents, daughters, sons, in-laws and best friends – add a nickname for each person and get those packages added to your cart! As you add each one, the orders will stack up on the right hand side with each order under the individual name.

Got everyone you need? We’ll hit CHECKOUT and head over to the next page.

Fill Out Your Information

On the next page, you can create an account, or click check out as a guest! Up to you. Then we’ll head over to your own personal billing and shipping information. Click SUBMIT SECURELY when you’re finished.

Fill Out Their Information

Get the addresses of your friends and family handy – time to type it in! Add their names, phone numbers and addresses. At the very bottom of this page, you can confirm your billing address on the credit card that you’ll be using on this particular order. Click CONTINUE TO SECURE PAYMENT PAGE, and let’s finish this order.

Choose Shipping and Enter Gift Messages

On the final page of your holiday order, you can confirm the items you’ll be sending to everyone on your list, as well as the choice of shipping! We offer UPS Ground for $7.95 and USPS Priority for $5.95 through our website. And if one of your gifts (to one address) goes over the $50 mark, you’ll receive free shipping on that order!

On the left hand side of the page, you’ll see the option to add a free gift message! Click ENTER TEXT and a pop up window will show up, allowing you to fill in your message. Be sure to sign your name, so they know who to thank for the wonderful present.

Then, just scroll down to the bottom of the page, fill in your credit card information… and that’s it! Click SUBMIT ORDER, and Thanksgiving Coffee will get your coffee out the door within just a few days.

Happy Holidays from all of us here at Thanksgiving Coffee Company!

Thanksgiving Coffee at Winesong 2017

Every year, we have the great opportunity to serve Thanksgiving Coffee at the food and wine-tasting event held in the beautiful Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens. Winesong is an annual charity auction, as well as a wine and food tasting, benefiting the Mendocino Coast District Hospital Foundation. Over three decades, this event has raised almost $8 million for improvements in local healthcare, and we make it a point to be there, doing our part.

Scroll down to the bottom of this page to see more about what the funds raised from Winesong goes to here in Fort Bragg!

This year, we were especially excited to join in on the festivities, because we were able to serve our spectacular nitro cold brew. We poured through three kegs of our nitro – about fourteen gallons!

Winesong

Thanks to everyone who came out to support our local hospitals, see you at Winesong 2018! Check out their website, and make sure you don’t miss next year’s event: www.winesong.org

More About Winesong:

Since 1984 the Mendocino Coast Hospital Foundation has engaged in fundraising and community activities to provide support for vital equipment and services at Mendocino Coast District Hospital. Our unique rural locale presents an environment in which the provision of comprehensive hospital services and up-to-date equipment is a tremendous challenge. The Hospital Foundation exists to help the Hospital and our community to meet these challenges.

National Dog Day

August 26 is National Dog Day, and we’re celebrating the only way we know how… by hanging out with man’s best friend! In honor of the 2017 National Dog Day on Saturday, here are some of the cutest puppy pics we could find from a few of our cafe accounts across the country!

From Milton’s Cafe in Lawrence, Kansas: @phoebonious_the_great

Obedience training? Phoebe has moved on to barista training.

National Dog Day in Kansas

From Caffe Etc. in Hollywood, California: @caffe_etc

A quick reminder from Fido to drink Fairtrade Coffee

National Dog Day in Los Angeles

From Park Chow in San Francisco, California: @gankstrr

Another cup of coffee for Porty!

National Dog Day in San Francisco

And of course, National Dog Day wouldn’t be complete without a throwback to our office pups on Take Your Dog to Work Day! Lot’s of love for Zoe (left) and Brutus (right), who are both at the Thanksgiving Coffee roastery almost every day.

National Dog Day at Thanksgiving Coffee Company


Support the Mendocino Coast Humane Society on National Dog Day!

We can’t close out a post about National Dog Day without one really important note. The pups in the photos above are all happy and loved by their humans — but there are so many dogs out there who don’t get the same love and devotion that every pet should receive. This is why we partner with the Mendocino Coast Humane Society to support the abandoned animals of Mendocino County. We have a full lineup of roast colors for our Good Dog and Cat Nap Blends, featuring a sweet former resident of the MCHS.

This Cause Coffee supports the efforts of the humane society to find homes for the animals that need it! Shop our lineup below:

   

Not Just A Cup, But A Just Cup

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Solar Eclipse 2017

Cities and communities across the line of totality have been preparing for a once in a lifetime experience: a coast to coast total solar eclipse in the United States. From West Coast to East, the line of totality touches Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. The last time we had a total solar eclipse this viewable from North America was in 1918. It’s been almost a century, and folks have been waiting for this event for a long time. Do you have enough coffee to get you through the two minutes you’ll be in complete darkness? (we suggest a light roast to balance out the event)

(We had a little bit of fun creating a coffee bean eclipse below… enjoy! If it isn’t loading for you, you can view it on YouTube)

Coffee Eclipse

Foggy in Fort Bragg

Here along the Mendocino Coast, we’re keeping our fingers crossed for blue skies. We’re dead in the middle of Fog-ust (that’s coastal living for you!), so we’ll get the darkness, likely without that view of the ring around the sun. Below is a shot of a partial solar eclipse (which is what we’ll have here in Fort Bragg), in foggy Austria back in 2011.

Cristaudo’s in Carbondale

We have one account that is exactly on the line of totality, in Southern Illinois. As one of the best spots for viewing (the longest duration and most perfect eclipse), Cristaudo’s Cafe in Carbondale is preparing for a crazy weekend ahead. If you’re traveling that way to view the eclipse, be sure to stop by and grab a cup of coffee! They’ve stocked up on adorable eclipse-themed cookies, and have a great selection of Thanksgiving Coffee to offer.

Good luck out there!

Thanksgiving Coffee Company
• 2017 Roaster of the Year •

Roasters Guild Retreat 2017

In the heat of Northern Georgia, the coffee roasting world is coming together for 18th annual Roasters Guild Retreat! We sent our Roastmaster Jacob Long, Roaster Joshua Long and Roastmaster Emeritus Paul Katzeff to the Lake Lanier Islands for a four-day roasting event.

Learn more: www.roastersguild.org

Jacob, Josh, Paul at the Roasters Guild Retreat!

We’ll upload more pictures as the event continues. You can follow along on Instagram at the #RGRetreat hashtag, or on the @RoastersGuild Instagram page!

New Thanksgiving Coffee Bags

You may have noticed our new look by now… Thanksgiving Coffee has new bags!

Thanksgiving Coffee Roasters Bags

This design is the result of months of work on the part of our Thanksgiving Coffee team – specifically our Brand Manager, Marchelo Bresciani. Our goals for this new package design were to celebrate our 70’s roots, and to help you find coffees that you can be confident you will enjoy. This post outlines some of the major things you’ll notice on your bag of Thanksgiving Coffee.

Roaster of the Year 2017

After winning this prestigious title from Roast Magazine, we knew it had to be an integral part of our packaging design, as well. You’ll notice in the far right image above, that our 2017 Roaster of the Year seal is prominently featured on the left side of our new design.

Learn more about how Thanksgiving Coffee became the 2017 Roaster of the Year!

Thanksgiving Coffee, Roaster of the Year

Packaging Patterns + Colors

The style of our new bags is a reflection of where we started. Thanksgiving Coffee Company was founded in 1972, and the rich/bold style of seventies can be seen in our new design. Bright yellow, orange and red splash across the bag – a reflection of award ribbons and racing stripes, in our classic colors. These colors were the inspiration of Brand Manager Marchelo, looking at coffee cherries at origin, and using those colors to represent who we are.

In addition to this coloring, we have a new way of designing our labels that puts the focus on roast color. The roast color determines about 80% of a coffee’s flavor, so we designed our new labels to make the roast color easy to spot at a glance. (Learn more about this on our Roast Color 101 blog!)

Light Roast in Yellow, Medium Roast in Orange, Dark Roast in Brown, Very Dark (French) Roast in Dark Brown.

Coffee Certifications

It’s no secret that coffee certifications are a big deal. Fairtrade, Rainforest Alliance, Bird-Friendly, Organic, Non-GMO – the number of certifications that a coffee roaster can get is overwhelming. At Thanksgiving Coffee Company, we have a number of certifications that we researched and vetted. We certify our coffees through the organizations that are doing the best work: for farmers at origin, for migratory bird conservancy, and for our customers. These are the certifications that we have chosen:

  • B Corp Certification, through B Lab
  • Fairtrade Certified, through Fairtrade America
  • Certified Bird-Friendly, through the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
  • USDA Organic, through CCOF
  • Kosher Certification, through OK Kosher

These certifications are featured on various coffees throughout our lineup. Our Bird-Friendly coffee is our Songbird Collection, benefiting the American Birding Association. You’ll find Fairtrade Certified and Certified Organic coffees throughout our entire selection, and our company as a whole is certified as a B Corporation. Every single coffee bean that comes from our Roastery is also Certified Kosher. You can learn more about each of these certifications in the Sustainability section of our website.

In the new package design, you’ll spot our Fairtrade and Organic certification right there on the front label! Our B Corp and Kosher certifications are listed along with our Roaster of the Year badge along the side of every package.

Share a Photo of Your Thanksgiving Coffee Bag

We love seeing our customers share photos of their Thanksgiving Coffee at home. Next time you receive a package of coffee, send it to us! You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram by searching for AJUSTCUP. Cheers!

Thanksgiving Coffee
• Not Just A Cup, But A Just Cup •

Shine On – National Lighthouse Day

May GrayJune Gloom. Fog-ust. Summer fog on the Mendocino Coast is so much more than an atmospheric condition; it’s a season. While some places may also experience seasonal fog, what happens here every summer begs to be experienced first hand in order to be truly appreciated. All visibility is completely obstructed behind the uniforming haze of grey, while the damp, heavy air smothers the breeze and mutes all sound. Standing in the middle a thick a summer fog is a disorientating form of sensory deprivation, and it’s no wonder how these conditions lead to what is considered to be the most significant shipwreck on the west coast.

On a foggy summer evening in 1850, a sailing brig named the Frolic struck the reef just north of Point Cabrillo, forever changing the fate of the California coast by leading to the discovery of the towering redwood forests. The lumber harvested in the years to follow would build the city of San Francisco and lead to the creation of towns and mills all along the Mendocino coast. But first, they would need a guiding light to prevent other ships from suffering the fate of the Frolic.

National Lighthouse Day at Point Cabrillo

The Point Cabrillo Light Station was first illuminated in 1909, and it’s light shone bright thanks to a modern marvel known as the Fresnel lens. The creation of the Fresnel lens was an enormous technological breakthrough in its time, and one that we still see today. The Point Cabrillo Light Station houses one of only three Fresnel lenses in the United States made by the English firm Chance Brothers, and one of the few still in operation today.

Thanks to the stalwart commitment of Point Cabrillo Light Keepers Association, this beautiful and unique piece of history remains in full operation, but it’s no small task to keep the light on. Over it’s 100 year history, the lighthouse has been threatened with closure or decommissioning on more than one occasion, and each time the community has rallied in support of our shining light. Thanksgiving Coffee is proud to play a small role in preserving this priceless legacy with the Light Keepers Blend fundraising coffee. Clear away the morning fog with a cup of coffee, while supporting a lighthouse that does the same.

Happy National Lighthouse Day! 

Not Just A Cup, But A Just Cup.

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Today is #NationalLighthouseDay and we are celebrating this piece of art along our Mendocino coastline: the Point…

Kenya Peaberry: Latest Arrival for August

Every month, our Roastmaster Jacob Long chooses a coffee in our warehouse to spotlight for the month. Our Latest Arrival is the coffee that has been delivered most recently to the Thanksgiving Coffee Roastery, and you’ll find that these coffees astound every time.

Kenyan CoffeeThe latest arrival for August is our Kenya Nyeri Peaberry, and tasting this coffee at its freshest is not something to be missed. This light roast from Africa has a unique mouthfeel with hints of milk chocolate, ripe peach, and caramel. We’re especially fond of this single origin, because it helped solidify our title as 2017 Roaster of the Year, from Roast Magazine. Along with our Ethiopian Yirgacheffe and Paul’s Blend, the Kenya Nyeri Peaberry was judged during a blind tasting alongside a variety of other entrants – and came out on top.

This year’s crop continues to perform well, and now that we’ve established this relationship with the Othaya group, we hope to see many more years of great tasting Kenyan Coffee. We had the opportunity to meet with Jim and Phyllis, representing the Othaya Cooperative, at the Global Coffee Expo back in April, and snagged this photo of them with our Roastmaster, Jacob Long.

Othaya Cooperative in Kenya

A week later, we received this note: 

Greetings Jacob.

It was so nice to meet you at SCA and learn that the coffee we produce helped you win Roaster of the Year. I am so glad our Othaya Peaberry performed so well. That is really a tribute to your ability to find the sweet spot of that coffee.

I hope you are just as happy with the coffees that come this year. As I mentioned Royal did a special project with us this year with red ripe cherries. If I recall correctly I gave you a few samples to cup. It will be good to hear what you think of them.

What made this project unique is that Othaya selected their best farmers to participate in the project and they agreed to wait from 10 to 14 days to pick only their best ripe cherries on the same day so they could be processed as a separate outturn (lot). Once the parchment completed the drying process it was immediately placed in grainpro and delivered to their dry mill. After dry milling it was immediately put back into grainpro and delivered to our warehouse and queued for hand picking improvement. The coffee will be hand picked in the next two weeks and shipped. You can expect this coffee to arrive around the end of July.

Best,
Jim

We’re looking forward to many more years of providing you with some of Africa’s best coffee. Order our Kenya Nyeri Peaberry Light Roast today, and try some of this truly fantastic, award-winning Kenyan Coffee now.

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A History in Nepalese Coffee

In 1998, I was in Nepal. I was there because USAID offered me a free trip, provided I completed their mission.

The mission: to assess the coffee world in Nepal, from the farm to the cup. Nepal had some history in coffee production but it was in the distant past. Not much was known about Nepal’s coffee experience in 1998 – so they sent me to find out.

I was set down in a small city called Tenzen. I was housed in a small hotel in the foothills at about 5,000 feet above sea level. From my window I could see five 20,000 foot mountain peaks all lined up, covered in snow, and glowing golden in the late afternoon sun.

Nepalese Coffee Roasters

I soon found out how this trip came about; A local Nepalese coffee store owner who roasted his own coffee (selling to tourists and mountain climbers) had requested coffee information from the U.S. Government.

The question foremost on the mind of that local coffee roaster in Nepal was not how to build an industry that would benefit coffee farmers, but how to market his coffee to tourists. He was interested in helping himself, not growing the benefits of coffee for the many farmers who had coffee trees on their land. These farmers did not drink coffee, and had no ready market to sell into. I immediately re-organized my time and the people I needed to meet. I visited the farms and spoke with the coffee farmers. I soon discovered that my host, the Nepalese coffee roaster, was not liked by the farmers, because he paid very low prices for the coffee he purchased from them.

I got back to my USAID sponsors in the U.S. and told them they had been sold a bill of goods by a self-serving local businessman, and that I could not narrow my study to “How to develop a coffee roasting industry in Nepal” in good conscience. The potential was minimal, and very few would be helped with this mission. Those helped would be the educated middle class, not the poorer coffee farmers, who numbered in the thousands.

Word got back to my host and he was furious. This is not a good thing to happen to someone in a foreign country in the 90’s, where anyone could disappear in some back alley in Kathmandu, or under twenty feet of snow on some nearby mountainside. But I persevered. I decided (since I was already there) to teach the coffee farmers how to prepare coffee cherries for home roasting in a wok. I figured once they knew how to prepare coffee for consumption, they would have the basis for growing coffee for flavor. The idea was that knowledge would open up doors to export coffee, and bring in more money for their families in the future.

Nepalese Coffee Farmers

When I travel to a country to teach coffee to coffee farmers, I always bring green coffee samples from five or six countries to show farmers how the final product looks. It is important to know what green coffee looks like after the seeds are removed from the cherry, perfectly sorted, graded, and then processed for export. I want them to see what they are aiming toward. I also bring a small popcorn popper (110V) to roast the coffee samples if there is electricity available. In this mountain village there was none, so we rested a wok on three round stones over a bamboo wood fire.

This was a great teachable moment. In an open wok, you can see the changes as they come about. We sat around the fire, stirring the beans with a long stick. The heat from a bamboo fire is hot, very hot. As the coffee turned from tan to a dark oily black, I took small portions from the wok and allowed them to cool in a cool metal pie tin. After 15 minutes of wok-stirred coffee beans, we had all seen the changes and we had four separate samples to taste: Light Roast, Medium Roast, Dark and Very Dark (French Roast).

So we began by harvesting five pounds of their local coffee cherries. In the process of harvesting I taught the importance of “Red Ripe.” We de-pulped the cherries by hand (squeezing each cherry until the wet and slimy seeds popped out. Then we set the seeds out to dry on newspaper in the shade. It took five days to get the coffee beans to dry. They start out at about 50% moisture to about 25% moisture, and they need to be at around 11% to begin to roast. The weather was not cooperating, so I finished the drying in a wok over a low flame for a few hours. Then we let the seeds rest overnight.

Now we had Nepal samples and the roasted samples I brought from Mexico, Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Comparison tasting is a good way for novices to get an idea of their own coffee as it might fare in the export market against the quality of other coffees. In addition, we had the four different roast colors which I wanted to use to show them how they could get different flavors from the same beans.

My next week was spent teaching the principles of coffee roasting and coffee tasting . “If you don’t know what you are aiming at, you can’t hit the target,” I told them. So we spent time tasting and identifying flavors.

It should be noted that the Nepalese are tea drinkers, and chai is their drink of choice. So when I was asked how coffee was prepared in other countries, I told them it was a medium for carrying flavors. In the U.S. we used primarily milk and sugar, but in other countries coffee drinkers added other spices. I encouraged them to prepare coffee however they would enjoy it, and that is what they did. Coffee/Chai formulas were the order of the day, for the next week. Every family made their own version of coffee, and they were all different and delightful. Nothing I have tasted since has come close.

I wrote my report for USAID and sent it in (this was the 90’s, pre-email) and left Nepal via Kathmandu to Bangkok, and then to San Francisco. I left behind 200 farmers who had gained knowledge in roasting and tasting, but had no infrastructure to organize anything. My mandate was to assess the situation and my report gave a clear assessment: build the coffee agriculture in Nepal, and let the roasting trade find its own way. Help the farmers was my message.

It has been two decades since my report was sent off to USAID. I believed I had failed to create what the farmers needed, but I was wrong!

Life goes on and you can’t discount the power of knowledge and education.

2017: Thanksgiving Coffee and Nepal

On Apr 5, 2017, almost twenty years later, I received this e mail from Mike at HimalayanArabica Nepal Coffee:

Hi Thanksgiving Coffee,

I found your company through Greenpages Org as we are also going through the application process and I wanted to take this opportunity to reach out to you to again.

HimalayanArabica believes in organic and ethical way of doing business and everyone along the supply chain from crop to cup can all benefit from doing business the right way.

Please give our coffee a try and you can get a free sample by simply emailing me your address and a phone number for the DHL packet.

I hope to hear from you soon and thank you for your time.

Kind regards,
Mike

Below is a shot of our Roastmaster Jacob Long on the left, posting with the same sack of Nepal Coffee as Michael Bowen, from HimalayanArabica on the right.

Nepal Coffee

I replied on Tue, Apr 11, 2017

Mike,

This e mail was very nice to receive,

In 2001 I was sent to Nepal by USAID to evaluate the Nepalese Coffee situation.

I was part of a team of two. We were asked to come by a man who wanted to develop the tourist trade for roasted coffee in Nepal. My report stated my opposition to this plan as it would not have created a coffee industry , but only one or two farms to provide him with coffee to roast and to sell in Katmandu. I recommended the development of the cultivation of coffee so that many could benefit.

I am happy to see and know that my vision was clear and that in fact, aid and market forces (and Nepalese common sense) made the right situation happen and now 16 years later someone is offering me coffee from Nepal that I can roast and market.

For starters, who in the US is your importer that will handle the coffee ?

What is the availability and shipping date?

How many sacks are available?

What quality do you have ?

Has the coffee been cupped and scored by Q graders or would you venture a guess as to its quality?

Who is roasting coffee from Nepal now?

Send samples to Thanksgiving Coffee Company:

PO Box 1918
19100 South Harbor Drive
Ft. Bragg, CA 95437

Thank you for taking the time to contact me. I am very interested and that is an understatement.

Paul Katzeff
CEO

Mike replied:

Hi Paul,

Thank you so much for your reply, it was very educational and got to understand a little piece of history of coffee here in Nepal. My name is Michael Bowen and I am a Korean-American grew up in Wisconsin. I spent some time in Korea and realized I wanted to do something else and somehow, almost magically, I came to live and work in Nepal and was given this fantastic opportunity to work with a company that has the same vision as I do, which is organic, ethical, sustainable and quality.

Raj, the owner, has been working tirelessly for more than 10 years to develop the farms in order for them to move towards the specialty market. Nothing is all set nor perfect here, but we are moving in the right direction.

Even though I have only come into the scene for a little more than a year, I can see that there is a lot of potential here which you undoubtedly saw 16 years ago.

Regarding your questions:

We do not have a dedicated US importer, at the moment.

There is about 8 tons available for shipment as soon as money is received and another 8-16 tons can be made available of the same quality from a different region after some weeks after the order is made.

We only have AAA specialty quality available for export.

Raj is a Q-grader himself and tastes the every batch that comes in. The samples we are sending out now have been sent out to various other graders from US, Europe and Australia and have scored between 83-86. Raj has scored this lot 85.5 SCAA standard.

There are several ‘roasters’ here in Nepal, but we also do our own roasts. Raj was the first to bring in equipment from abroad, from pulping machines to a roaster from Italy, but now there are several places where roasting is done. Raj, I believe, has the most experience roasting and you can check out our website at the ‘home’ section for testimonials for more reviews of our coffee and you can check out some roasted beans we offer.

We will send out samples this week and I will notify you the tracking number.

Kind regards,
Mike

That’s the story in a nutshell.

Time + Knowledge = Evolution.

We received the samples from Mike at HimalayanArabica, and I was surprised at the flavors and the cup quality. But I was more surprised at how good I felt about what I did twenty years ago in the hills of Nepal. I believed that I had failed to make change happen for those isolated coffee farmers, and that there was no hope for Nepalese Coffee.

Life goes on.

Paul Katzeff
Mendocino, California


Order your own bag of Nepal Coffee now.

Rich and velvety with underlying hints of raisin.

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Only the Strong Survive: A Story from New York

I was born in The Bronx. I played stick ball. I hung out at the corner candy store. I bought two pretzels for 3¢.

We read comic books, which cost a dime. Once they were read, we traded them for 2¢. You could take your old comics out on the street, set them up on a wooden box, and collect your money for pretzels or an egg cream (8¢). The 50’s were pretty good for a kid. You could go anywhere in the city for a nickle subway ride, and you never thought it was dangerous.

I could tell you a million stories about growing up in the Bronx, including the time I went back in 1975, five years after I had left for California. I discovered that “my” candy store had become a Korean market. The soda fountain, comic books and telephone booths were all gone. (telephone booths were for the local bookies to take their bets and call in their bets they wanted to “lay off.”

I bought a t-shirt that stated The Bronx: Only the Strong Survive.

By the time I was 13 in 1951, I was traveling to Harlem to see the NY Giants play baseball at the Polo Grounds. One night, I remember sneaking into the Polo Grounds to see the Giants play the Cubs. I don’t remember the game at all, but I do remember what happened after the game…

It was about 11:30pm. I was waiting in the parking lot with my program for the ball players to come out of the locker rooms. Autographs were my goal. A reward for successfully sneaking into the game. It was dark, it was Harlem, it was late at night. All the cars were gone. There were no overhead street lamps to light up the parking area. But it was safe… or was it?

Where were the players? I had waited. Paid my dues, but nothing was happening as I watched the last few cars abandon me to being totally alone on a three acre unlit parking lot at midnight in Harlem. Then, a door opened and out came four players. The encounter went something like this:

#1: Hey kid, what are you doing here in the dark?

Kid: Waiting to get autographs.

#2: Where you live kid?

Kid: Palham Parkway.

#3: How you getting home?

Kid: I will walk over that bridge (138th st) to the subway and take the train home.

#4: Get in the car, we’ll take you to the subway station.

I got in the car and have no recollection of anything else. Thirty-four years later, while showing my six-year-old son my baseball card collection (the one most mothers are reputed to throw away), out popped the Giants’ 1951 program. I had not looked at it for over thirty years. Much to my surprise, it had three autographs on the cover and one inside. Who were these players who saw fit to rescue a 13 year old white boy from the long dark walk to the subway?

Willie Mays, Monte Irvin, Hawk Thompson. All Hall of Famers. Inside was Don Mueller, the 1951 national league batting champion. They’re the first four guys from the left on the bottom row of the photo below.

There is a lot of the Bronx still left in me. I had my first cup of coffee in the Bronx. They said it was mountain grown and good to the last drop.

Today, 65 years later, I want you to taste a Bronx-influenced blend of coffee I proudly named for myself (THAT’S Bronx Moxie!) I am proud of this blend. It took a lot of personal coffee experience to understand, as I eventually did, how to get the flavor profile I wanted. It’s a Bronx kind of coffee! Intense, heavy, with blueberry/strawberry notes and a long finish. The coffees are from Ethiopia and Nicaragua. Two countries where only the strong survive.

Paul Katzeff, co-founder and CEO of Thanksgiving Coffee Company

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