Clean Cookstoves in Uganda

By Paul Katzeff, CEO + Co-Founder, Thanksgiving Coffee Company

In 2012 Thanksgiving Coffee Company, in collaboration with the Mirembe Kawomera Board and members, began a Climate change mitigation initiative in the foothills of Mt. Elgon, with the cooperative. The first phase was tree planting, and the project had these basic principles at its core:

  • The trees would provide shade to keep the ground cool and moist
  • The trees would enhance the habitat for indigenous birds and other wildlife
  • Deep root systems of trees holds the moisture in the soil and brings nutrients from deep in the ground to the surface via leaf litter produced by the trees. This makes the soil more fertile.
  • The trees soften the impact of rainstorms and mitigate against runoff that carries away topsoil
  • Shade improves the health of coffee trees as well as the flavor profile.
  • Trees produce wood for cooking and reduce the need for long distance hauling of wood
  • Trees bring up the water table and enable the ground to hold more water
JB Birenge, Climate Change Mitigation project leader in 2012 (photo credit: Ben Corey Moran)

JB Birenge, Climate Change Mitigation project manager in 2012 (photo credit: Ben Corey Moran)

There remained a problem.

The coop members were relying on the climate change mitigation tree planting as a source of firewood for their open fire cooking. Open fires are a simple but extremely wasteful way to build a cook fire, so the coop members decided that if they had more efficient ways to cook, they would lower their use of firewood. This plan was the best way to allow the trees to grow to maturity before being sustainably pruned for firewood, and thus was born “The Clean Cookstove Project.”
Rock fire rings are traditionally used to cook food

Rock fire rings are traditionally used to cook food

In partnership with Carrotmob, Thanksgiving Coffee Company raised $4,600 in a crowd-funding campaign. The funds were allocated for the Clean Cookstove project. The General Manager of the cooperative designed the project,  researched the methodology, hired local craftsmen and women, gathered materials, and began building the stoves in April of this year. In this first phase of the project, 46 families will receive the stoves. Families with children, older people and single parent families were chosen by the coop as are recipients of the first 46 stoves. The plan is to expand the program so all 300 coop member families eventually have one built for them in their homes.

The benefits of clean cookstoves are many.

Obviously, better respiratory health and easier fuel collecting because these stoves use 1/10 the fuel to produce a cooked meal. That means more time to attend school, make music, do homework or whatever leisure time is used for in a small village at the base of a mountain, where there is no cafe to hang out, no community center, and where electricity is limited to a few outlets per square mile. We are proud to be associated with this project – happier, healthy coffee farmers means a better world, and better coffee.

Aisa Kainza with her Clean Cookstove

Aisa Kainza with her Clean Cookstove

I am currently in Uganda, on a trip that was planned back in February when I was last in Africa.

Much has happened since, including a clear Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that outlines our and the Cooperatives responsibilities and expectations from the relationship we have created. The goal of this trip is mostly oversight. We are advancing funds to the Cooperative to double its washing station capacity. This will require a solar drying system of greatly increased capacity, and a financial system that is going to handle twice the amount of money, double the volume of coffee, and provide more transparency. We are building capacity and the requirement for a higher level of professional financial management will be required as soon as this next crop is ready in September. That is in about 60 days!

There is lots to do – and we want to be a part of the doing.

To be continued…
-Paul

Comments (6)

  • Avatar

    Don

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    That is a fine looking handmade earthen / cement? stove sitting there! How does somebody cook on that?

    • Avatar

      Paul Katzeff

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      They put a pot of Fillet Mignon seasoned with Madera wine and asparagus tips over one of the holes. They build a fire in the fire box undernieth and the heat from the fire cooks the ingredients in the pot. It is simple pyrotechnics.

  • Avatar

    Paul Katzeff

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    Pots are put over the stove top openings . Smoke goes out chimney.
    Works !

  • Avatar

    Will

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    Love it—had a cup at Caffe Etc. in Hollywood a couple days ago and saw the pamphlet about this. Gotta love drinking coffee and feeling good about it knowing someone somewhere in the world is benefiting, even if it’s a teeny bit. Anyway, wish you guys had some social sharing buttons on your articles, I’m sharing by copying/pasting the url but it would be awesome to just click. 🙂 (if you need web help with this feel free to contact, btw, I implemented something like that on my brother’s site—he’s an artist who does coffee art. http://www.mikelanni.com)

    • Avatar

      Marchelo Bresciani

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      Excellent suggestion Will!
      We have set up sharing links that now appear at the end of every article, thanks to your input. 😀

      I took a look at your brother’s site- love his work! “Coffee Art 043” is my favorite so far, might just have to get a print for the office… Thanks for sharing!

  • Avatar

    birenge

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    Thank you for having started something I call beautiful service to others

Comments are closed

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