Cupping Ethiopian Coffees

paul-23

"Natural" drying method in Ethiopia (photo credit: Menno "the Dutchman")

About two weeks ago Ben  came back from Uganda and Rwanda after visits with the coffee  cooperatives we are working with . You can read his blog entry to learn what he does when he makes the long voyage to Africa twice each year, and why such visits are so central to the way Thanksgiving Coffee does business. In fact, the way we “source ” our coffees is the defining difference between Thanksgiving Coffee Company and all other specialty coffee companies in the USA.  On his way home  Ben stopped in Amsterdam to visit with our Ethiopian Coffee intermediary and exporter at his office which happens to be less then 500 feet from where the first coffee exchange was set up over 500 years ago.  There is a great book about the way coffee and coffee tree seeds were smuggled out of Yemen in the late 1490’s by a  Portuguese  Jewish man( who escaped the Spanish Inquisition seeking  religious  freedom in Holland) and his financial partner, a Dutch woman of great stature.  The name of the book is The Devils Cup . It reads like a cross between a Hunter Thompson Gonzo monolog and a John Steinbeck travelog . A thoroughly enjoyable read. But I digress…     While in Amsterdam Ben received a dozen samples of various Ethiopian coffee samples to bring home for us roast up and taste.   This we did yesterday and the results were just wonderful . All the samples were from the Sidama Region . It is traditional in the coffee trade here in the USA to call the region “Sidamo” but I have been told by  knowledgeable  people that Sidamo means monkey and is considered a racist slur in Ethiopia. Regardless, the coffees were produced using the “washed” or “wet” method as opposed to the “dry” or “natural method”. I am partial to coffees produced via the wet method and Ben is partial to coffees produced using the dry method. The difference in taste each produces from the same coffee is profound and worth noting for your reference.     Dry or Natural coffees  are processed by allowing the cherry pulp to dry while still surrounding the coffee seeds within the cherry. This allows the fruity/fermenty flavors in the pulp to penetrate the seeds as they dry, imparting a sweet-sour flavor that reminds one of Blueberries and strawberries . When the whole cherry is totally dry, it is taken to a mill and “dehulled” to expose the coffee beans(seeds). The best “naturals” have so much personality you almost believe they have been altered with fruit syrups . Ethiopia and Yemen do the best jobs with naturals in my opinion. The blends we created for The California Academy of Science and for the Danville Chow Restaurant are based on Ethiopian naturals that ben discovered last year while  trekking  through the coffee regions of Ethiopia in search for a great Natural . I believe the one he found at the Hache Cooperative is one of Ethiopia’s best.

Coffee blossems have a fine aroma

Coffee blossems have a fine aroma

We purchased 37,500 lbs of it last year and we anticipate the coffee will be just as fruity in 2009.       I, however, prefer the wet processed ethiopian coffees. The pulp is removed from the seeds within hours of picking. The seeds are soaked water for 24-36 hours depending on water temperature, and then the seeds(beans) are set out to dry on cement patios to get down to a stable 11-12 % moisture .   Coffees processed this way  have a distinct citric brightness or acidity , showing hints of lemon and stone fruits like apricot and peach. They are bright and lively in the cup , which I prefer over the heavy and mellow mouthfeel of the naturals. But dont get me wrong, my preference is for washed coffees but a good natural is a wonder to behold.  We are now at 601 words. Enough!  You all are in for some great Ethiopian washed coffees this year in addition to  the great naturals we found last year. We will keep you posted as to their arrival date and availability

 

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