Recognizing the Unpaid Work of Women in Ethical Supply Chains

A group poses at the 7/3/13 Event

Our partners at Ético: The Ethical Trading Company, along with the British NGO Social Business Network are pioneering the first ever initiative to Recognize the Unpaid Work of Women in Ethical Supply Chains.

Traditionally, the price for commodity products (like coffee) include only direct input and labor costs, and fail to recognize or take into account the supporting unpaid work, which is done mainly by women.  This is the first time that rural women’s unpaid work has been recognized as a necessary input into production – one that should be valued and remunerated.

The initiative developed in 2008 during a visit of the Body Shop with the Juan Francisco Paz Silva Cooperative in Achuapa, Nicaragua.  Ético gender advisor Catherine Hoskyns conducted a pilot study of women’s labor in sesame production.  Her initial findings revealed that when women’s indirect labor (eg. cooking food for field laborers) and more general domestic work are included, this counts for around 22% of the total labor input in sesame.

The results of the study were used to apply an additional cost to the price of the sesame oil for cosmetics, and has since been used to apply similar costs to the sales of coffee from Nicaraguan Cooperatives.  The Cooperatives use the increase in price margin to organize women’s empowerment activities in their communities, such as education, savings and loans schemes and labor organization, which bring women together and strengthen the cooperatives.

Nick Hoskyns, Founding Director of Ético, states, “when you bring together committed partners, you can use business to effect real change….with such good collaborators, we have shown that we can still make trade fairer, just as we did with the establishment of Fair Trade.”  Hoskyns credits cooperative organizations with being instrumental in the implementation of this initiative and using the additional funds so effectively for women’s empowerment.

At Thanksgiving Coffee, we’re proud to partner with Ético to implement projects at origin.

Comments (2)

  • Avatar

    Mireya Asturias Jones

    |

    We would love for Etico to know about us and the Chapters that we have built internationally to support, train and network with Women in Coffee. I think that we may be overlapping and could collaborate with the women in Nicaragua.

    • Avatar

      Mischa Hedges

      |

      Mireya – thanks for your message. I’ve forwarded this on to Nick Hoskyns and Rachel Lindsay at Ético and the Social Business Network. I expect they’ll be in touch!

      -Mischa

Comments are closed

How do you take your coffee?

Home

Home

Pick the perfect coffee by roast color or origin.

Shop Now

Gifts

Gifts

Share our coffee with Gift Certificates and Gift Bags.

Shop Now

Subscriptions

Subscriptions

Join our Coffee Clubs and never run out again!

Shop Now

Wholesale

Wholesale

Inquiry about ordering our coffee wholesale.

Shop Now