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Thanksgiving Coffee Company has created Bee Bold Coffee, made a commitment to our bees, and is ready to share it with Mendocino.

Jonah and Paul Katzeff at the Bee Bold Booth

In October, Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op (UNF) had their grand re-opening. After 39 years they remodeled their store, and we thought it a perfect time to introduce Bee Bold Mendocino, a local movement to save the bees.  So Paul Katzeff, Co-Founder & CEO (pictured in the middle), Jonah Katzeff Vice President (below right) , and myself, Lavender Cinnamon, Community Development (below left), all went to UNF to represent Thanksgiving Coffee and share our commitment to the bees.

Bee Bold Mendo 1st EventBee Bold Mendocino came about when Friends Of the Earth (FOE) asked Paul for a donation.  He offered instead to create a source of ongoing support for their environmental work. As the partnership began to take shape they said, “help us fund our Bee Bold project “. Paul did just that and created  #Bee Bold Coffee. The project went straight to his heart, and so did the bees.  (link)

When I joined Thanksgiving Coffee Company this past year, this partnership with FOE was just taking flight, and it took hold of my heart as well.  It has instilled in me a deeper understanding for this delicate balance of life that we all share, and inspired me to become a steward of the bees.  “Everything the bees do is about relationship with one another.  The story of colony collapse is a story of how the relationships have been broken, contaminated, or subverted.  It is a story of ignorance, thoughtlessness and selfishness- qualities we humans bring to far too many of our relationships, from the most personal and intimate, to the most global and insitutional” Jacqueline Freeman – The Song of Increase (link)

There are many factors at play regarding the health of the bees, however the three main reasons for the decline in the bee populations are; systemic pesticides – neonicotinoids, malnutrition, and disease/mites.  The latter being a result of the first two; if your system is poisoned and not properly nourished, your susceptibility to disease is drastically increased. (link)  This is what modern farming practices are doing to the health of the pollinators. If we do not learn from this now and change the way we relate to our food, we will not have healthy food left to eat. The simple truth is, do not poison the land, do not poison the water, use the plants as medicine, and grow healthy nourishing food.

As an advocate for Mendocino’s bees, Thanksgiving Coffee Company is committed to educate, gather support from our community, and create an advisory committee to pass a local ordinance that will ban these neonicotinoids (bee killing pesticides) within Mendocino County.   This is why we said “yes” to be a part of Ukiah Natural’s event. This is why Thanksgiving Coffee joined the movement to help save the bee population, and this is how Bee Bold Mendocino was created. (link)

Jonathan and Elliot Local Bee Keepers

There is no way to do this alone. We need to work with the knowledge of those who are already engaged with bees and pollinators.   So, we reached out to the community to join us, and we had a wonderful response that included; 2 local bee keepers, 2 farmers, and a table set up to create your own pollinator seed balls.

Our beekeepers came from inland and the coast. Jonathan Hunt (on left) is part of the 4-H bee keeping program in Ukiah.  He contacted me and said he would love to come participate.  He brought with him his delightful enthusiasm and knowledge of bee keeping, as well as some wild crafted seeds he had collected for people to take and plant.

Elliot Brooks (on right) came with a top bar hive, he had built himself, and his entire bee keeping gear.  He also brought some of the honeycomb from his hive that the bees had made for people to see, and touch the magic of bees wax.  It was an absolute delight to spend the day with them.

With the help of UNF a table was set up for people to come, get their hands dirty, and help create pollinator seed balls. These pollinator balls included: clay, fertilizer and native wild seeds.  They are a way to help provide the necessary diversity of food sources the bees need for optimum health. Once you made the seed balls, you could to take them home for your own yard, or throw them into an open field or empty yard.

Hands in the seeds and dirtThis idea for the pollinator seed ball table came from Tiffany at FOE when asked for suggestions on how to engage children into the wonderful world of bees.  We all thought this was a great way to offer a hands on experience .

These seed bombs originate as a fun and friendly tactic for “guerrilla gardeners” to throw balls of seeds and fertilizer into fenced-off spaces that are otherwise neglected, or land in zoning limbo. We wanted to offer something for people to take home that can make an immediate difference.  It was wonderful to see the hands of so many people making the seed balls, knowing that they will offer a great food source to our bees.

Speaking of dirt and seeds, Tim Ward joined us.  He  works as Director of Fundraising and Programming at the Grange Farm School. Grange Farm School logoI came across their website when I was doing research on  different organizations in Mendocino County we would like to help and to promote their work. It was very exciting to discover this school right here in Willits dedicated to “improve agricultural literacy, food security, and ecological stewardship in our community and beyond.”  I love how they teach someone to be a complete farmer, taking into consideration all of the skills one needs to be a sustainable food producer. (link)

The School began in 2014 and operates on 12 acres of the Ridgewood Ranch, and is supported by a wide network across the region, state, nation, and world!

The Farm School recognizes the immediate need to train the next generation of farmers to support themselves, with a focus on production and distribution methods that emphasize long-term environmental responsibility.

The School builds on the rich agricultural heritage of Mendocino County and the Grange in its diverse and holistic educational programming for farmers, aspiring farmers, and youth. The Grange has been dedicated to serving the cooperative farming movement since 1867!  And yes, the Grange Farm School cares for our bees, and cooperation, which is an amazing skill the bees teach.

We would be remiss if we did not have representation from the wineries.  Mendocino County has over 17,000 acres of vineyards. It is essential that we help educate the vineyards and those who buy wine to the importance of the bees, even if grapes themselves are wind pollinated.   Today 25% of Mendocino vineyards are growing certified organic grapes, with the Frey family’s winery being the first Organic winery in Mendocino County, and the Nation, back in 1980.   If your wine is not organic, please ask if the winery uses neonicotinoids on the grapes.  Help educate the wine industry on how to help keep our pollinators alive.Jess Arnsteen & Erin Ravin-Parducci

We had the pleasure of Mendocino County’s oldest winery joining us,
Parducci Wine Cellars (Certified organic).  They understand the value and benefit of the bees. Jess Arnsteen came with Erin Ravin to share their organic, pollinator friendly practices.  Parducci was the first carbon neutral winery in the country (2007) and in recognition of their continuing dedication to social responsibility and environmentally sound practices, they received California’s highest environmental award, the Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award.  They are also leaders in water reclamation and water-conservation program.

Jess works as Manager of Edible Ecosystems where he tends his flock of sheep, and a 15-acre garden that feeds over 60 employees from Parducci .  Jess is very involved with the chain of pollinator to food, he understands the importance of our pollinators and came with arms full of pollinator food/flowers to share with us. (link)

The entire event was a true pleasure, from the collaboration with Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op, who have been one of our loyal customers for over 38 years.  It just felt like home.

Pictured here is Mary Anne Cox, Ukiah Natural’s Marketing Manager (on right) she was a real treasure to work with, and Lori Rosenburg (on left) Ukiah Natural’s General Manager was a wonderful host.  We were graciously welcomed by the entire crew from UNF.

“Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op was incorporated in 1976. By serving the needs of our diverse membership, we have grown through the years.  Our current store has more than 6,800 square feet of space, and we serve over a thousand shoppers each day.”

It seemed only natural to introduce our #Bee Bold Coffee at their re-opening event, as we work together towards the health of our community and our bees in Mendocino. If you are in Ukiah go on in, say hi, and pick up some of the #Bee Bold Coffee in their store.

NoyoOur most recent and exciting news since this event, is that Noyo Food Forest has joined us as the fiscal sponsor for Bee Bold Mendocino.

The Noyo Food Forest is a non-profit that grows community, as they say “one garden at a time”.  They teach the value, and satisfaction of growing one’s own food, while giving support to local food sovereignty and independence. We are extremely grateful to Noyo Food Forest for all of their wonderful work.  (link).

 

I leave you with one more quote from The Song of Increase.

“Evolution isn’t random.  We all work together.  The act of working together IS the evolution. Cooperation between us accelerates  development of each species.  The way we hold and support ourselves and each other advances our shared evolution”

For current news and developments of Bee Bold in Mendocino you can visit www.facebook.com/beeboldmendo

If you want to participate please call Lavender Cinnamon 707 964-0118 ext. 107 or email me at lavender@thanksgivingcoffee.com