Brewing Guide

Tools For Better Brewing Results

Stovetop

GRIND
Start with a fine grind setting (#3.5), slightly coarser than texture of granulated sugar. When pinched, the ground coffee should not compress or clump.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Fill the coffee chamber with finely ground coffee, be careful not to pack the coffee too densely.
  2. In a kettle, boil enough water to fill the water chamber.
  3. Place freshly boiled water in the water chamber, place coffee-filled chamber on top, and, using a towel or pot holder to protect your hand from heat, screw on the brewed coffee chamber.
  4. Place the stove top espresso maker on a burner at low to medium heat.
  5. As the coffee brews, watch and listen for a sputtering noise; this signals the end of the brewing. Immediately remove the espresso maker from the stove and run the bottom (water chamber) under cold water for 10 seconds to cool the chamber and stop the extraction.
  6. Serve your fresh espresso and enjoy.

Hario

GRIND
Start with a medium-fine grind (#5.5), somewhere between the texture of granulated sugar and couscous.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Measure 1.5 grams for every ounce of water or 2 heaping tablespoons of ground for every 5 ounces of water.
  2. Place paper filter in cone over cup or pitcher.
  3. Bring water to boil and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) through the filter-lined cone to rinse the paper filter and warm the server below.
  4. Let the water drop to 200 degrees, about 2 minutes off boil. Empty the water that was used to rinse the filter and warm the server.
  5. Place ground coffee in the rinsed and filter-lined cone and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) over the grounds to saturate and create a bloom. Wait 45 seconds.
  6. As the bloom settles, continue the pour as slowly as possible, stopping the pour as necessary so that the water never reaches above the original bloom volume. This will require stopping the pour every 15–30 seconds. Pour slowly and in a circular motion, with the goal of dispensing the total water used to brew in about 3 minutes.
  7. Remove the used filter and coffee and swirl the brewed coffee for 10 seconds.
  8. Serve and enjoy.

If the brew time is less than 2:30–3 minutes and the taste is weak, experiment with a finer grind. If the brew time is more than 3–3:30 minutes and the taste is bitter, experiment with a coarser grind.

Chemex

GRIND
Start with a medium-coarse grind (#7.5), slightly finer than the texture of kosher salt. The particle size should be flaky, with visible chunks.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Measure 2 grams for every ounce of water or 2 generously heaping tablespoons of ground for every 5 ounces of water.
  2. Separate 3rd and 4th layers of filter and place in Chemex pot.
  3. Bring water to boil and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) through the filter-lined cone to rinse the paper filter and warm the pot below.
  4. Let the water drop to 200 degrees, about 2 minutes off boil. Empty the water that was used to rinse the filter and warm the pot.
  5. Place ground coffee in the rinsed and filter lined cone and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) over the grounds to create saturate and create a bloom. Wait 45 seconds.
  6. As the bloom settles, continue the pour as slowly as possible, stopping the pour as necessary so that the water never reaches above the original bloom volume. This will require stopping the pour every 15–30 seconds. Pour slowly and in a circular motion, with the goal of dispensing the total water used to brew in 3–4 minutes.
  7. Remove the used filter and coffee and swirl the brewed coffee for 10 seconds.
  8. Serve and enjoy.

NOTE: If the brew time is less than 3–4 minutes and the taste is weak, experiment with a finer grind. If the brew time is more than 3–4 minutes and the taste is bitter, experiment with a coarser grind.

Cold Brew

WHAT IS COLD BREW?
Cold coffee is the chilled-out variant of the hot coffee you know and love. More then just a cooler brew, cold coffees have their own distinct flavor profiles due to the differences in how the essential oils are extracted from the coffee bean; cold and slow vs. hot and fast.

Most coffee retailers use hot-brewed coffee in their iced coffee drinks because it is faster/easier. They will typically brew hot with twice the amount of grounds for a double-strength concentrate that can be refrigerated and diluted. Unfortunately, this method completely misses the many benefits that cold-brewed coffee has to offer.

Cold-brewed coffee is 67 percent less acidic than coffee that is hot-brewed.

HOW IT’S MADE
Cold-brewed coffee is made by soaking coffee grounds in cold water for 12 or more hours, usually brewed overnight. This method allows for a slow extraction of the coffee’s flavor, producing a super-smooth brew that has 67% less acidity then conventional hot-brewed coffee. This means that cold-brewed coffee is less bitter and easier on sensitive stomachs. In fact, the AARP recently recommended cold-brew for seniors who have problems with acidic coffee.

In addition to being smooth and low on acidity, cold-brewed coffee keeps for significantly longer with no loss of flavor. By brewing cold, the flavor compounds within the coffee are more stable and won’t degrade as quickly as hot brewed coffee, which can become overly bitter in a matter of hours.

A batch of cold-brewed coffee can last for up to two weeks.

Cold-brewing offers an alternate way to enjoy our delicious coffees. Try your favorite coffee brewed cold and taste the difference for yourself.

Melita/Cone

GRIND
Start with a medium-coarse grind (#7.5), slightly finer than the texture of kosher salt. The particle size should be flaky, with visible chunks.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Measure 2 grams for every ounce of water or 2 generously heaping tablespoons of ground for every 5 ounces of water.
  2. Place paper filter in cone over cup.
  3. Bring water to boil and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) through the filter-lined cone to rinse the paper filter and warm the cup below.
  4. Let the water drop to 200 degrees, about 2 minutes off boil. Empty water used to pre-heat cup.
  5. Place ground coffee in the rinsed and filter-lined cone and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) over the grounds to saturate and create a bloom. Wait 45 seconds.
  6. As the bloom settles, continue the pour slowly, stopping the pour as necessary so that the water never reaches above the original bloom volume. Pour slowly and in a circular motion, with the goal of dispensing the total water used to brew in 3-4 mintues.
  7. Serve your fresh brewed coffee and enjoy.

NOTE: Experiment with a finer grind for a more intense brew, or a coarser grind for a less intense brew.

French Press

GRIND
Start with a coarse grind setting (#8) approximately the size and texture of kosher salt. The particle size should be flaky, with visible chunks.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Measure 2 grams for every ounce of water or 2 generously heaping tablespoons of ground for every 5 ounces of water.
  2. Bring water to a boil and pour a small amount into the press to pre-heat.
  3. Let the water drop to 200 degrees, about 2 minutes off boil.
  4. Pour out water used to pre-heat, pour in measured ground coffee, and pour the water to saturate grounds.
  5. Start timer. At one minute, gently stir dry cap with a spoon to completely saturate coffee in water. Place the top over the press.
  6. At 4 minutes, slowly press the coffee.
  7. Serve and enjoy.

NOTE: Experiment with a finer grind for a more intense brew, or a coarser grind for a less intense brew.

Aeropress

GRIND
Start with a medium-fine grind (#5.5), somewhere between the texture of granulated sugar and couscous.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Place paper in black filter cap and lock onto brew chamber, place over cup.
  2. Bring water to boil and pour a small amount of water (approximately 4 ounces) through the filter-lined and capped brew chamber to rinse the paper filter and warm the server below.
  3. Let the water drop to 200 degrees, about 2 minutes off boil. Empty the water that was used to rinse the filter and warm the server.
  4. Fill brew chamber to just below the “1” mark with coffee.
  5. Pour approximately 2 ounces of water onto the ground coffee in the brew chamber. Start timer.
  6. Wait 30 seconds for the bloom to settle.
  7. Slowly fill with water to just above the “4” mark, stir gently, and wait one minute.
  8. Place plunger and slowly plunge brew into cup.
  9. Serve and enjoy.

Softbrew

WHAT IS SOFTBREW?
While pour-over/manual brewing methods continue to gain popularity, SoftBrew offers a simple alternative for making a stellar cup of coffee.

This high-tech but easy to use brewing method, provides a pure expression of the coffee’s flavor. The mouth-feel is similar to that of a French Press, but with a better range of flavors and less sediment in your cup.

The porcelain pot is great for serving, but it does not retain heat for very long. To enjoy hot coffee throughout the day, transfer the brew to an insulated pot.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the pot and filter with about 4oz of hot water.
  2. Empty the preheat water and add 65g of freshly ground beans into the filter.
  3. Add half of the total water (16oz), taking care to evenly soak the grounds.  The ideal temperature is 196° for dark roasts, 200° for light roasts.
  4. Stir for an even mixture and allow the bloom to settle.
  5. Add the rest of the water (16oz) and give the grounds another good stir.
  6. Put the lid on the pot and let the coffee brew for 3-4 minutes.
  7. Remove the filter.
  8. Pour and enjoy!

SoftBrew_how-to

Coffee Brewing Basics

Coffee to water ratio

Using the correct amount of coffee will ensure that your coffee is brewed to strength, without over-extracting or under-extracting the coffee to compensate for an inappropriate dose. We recommend 2 grams of coffee for every fluid ounce of water used to brew. Weighing coffee is the most accurate way to measure the appropriate dose. If a scale is not available, we recommend 2 heaping tablespoons of ground coffee for every 5 ounces of water used to brew.

Grind Size

Producing the correct particle size in ground coffee is one of the most important steps in coffee brewing. In general, a finer grind will produce a more intense brew and a coarser grind will produce a less intense brew. At the same time, a grind that is too fine will produce an over-extracted, astringent brew, and a grind that is too coarse will produce a weak, under-extracted brew lacking flavor. In pour-over methods, grind size also affects the rate of extraction, as water will pass more slowly through a finer grind, and more quickly through a coarser grind. We strongly recommend burr grinders over blade grinders.

Cleaning

Coffee contains numerous oils that build up over time. For best results, thoroughly clean your brewing and grinding equipment after each use.

Water temperature and quality

Water temperature dramatically affects the extraction of coffee’s flavor during brewing. We recommend brewing with water at 200° Fahrenheit for best results. Using fresh, clean, chlorine-free water is essential.

Coffee freshness and storage

Coffee is very sensitive to heat, moisture, and oxygen. It should be stored at room temperature in an airtight container. For best results, grind coffee fresh, just before brewing.

Perfecting Brew by Roast

Perfecting your brew for light roasts

When brewing lightly roasted coffees, experiment with a grind and water temperature that produces a rich brew with a clean, sweet finish. If your brew is weak, increase the amount of coffee first, and then experiment with a finer grind. If your brew is bitter, or dry in the finish, try a coarser grind first, and then experiment with brewing using a smaller dose.

Perfecting your brew for dark roasts

When brewing dark roasts, a coarser grind and heavier dose and slightly cooler water will produce a smoother, heavier flavor. Because many of the sugars have been carmelized to the point of carbonization, there is actually less soluble sugar in a darkly roasted coffee. To create a sweet brew it’s essential that you use enough coffee rather than overextracting flavor from insufficient coffee to achieve the desired intensity. By using a heaver dose, cooler water, and experimenting with a coarser grind, you can achieve an intensely sweet dark roast brew.

Contact

OFFICE: (707) 964-0118

MAIL ORDER: (800) 648-6491

Wholesale: (800) 462-1999

Address

PO BOX 1918
Fort Bragg, CA 95437