Our 1st #BeeBold Mendocino Advisory Committee Meeting

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A wonderful way to begin a bee friendly county!

On Tuesday February 2nd, 2016 Thanksgiving Coffee Company hosted the first Bee Bold Mendocino Advisory Committee meeting.

The goal is to make Mendocino the first “Bee Friendly” County in California.

The meeting  began with introductions all around.

Top row left to right – Paul Katzeff – CEO and Co-Founder of Thanksgiving Coffee Company, Tanya Wyldflower – Coastal Bee Keeper, Lavender Cinnamon – Community Development for Thanksgiving Coffee Company, Joan Katzeff – President and Co-Founder of Thanksgiving Coffee Company, Elmer Whaley – Community Environmental Activist, Betty Lou Whaley – Coastal Bee Keeper, Erin Arnsteen – Pollinator Friendly Gardening, Parducci Vineyards, Jess Arnsteen – Manager of Edible Ecosystem for Parducci Vineyards.

Bottom row from left to right, Tim Ward- Farmer and Director of Fundraising and Programming at the Grange Farm School, Sakina Bush – Mendocino Farmers Market Manager, Miles Gordon – Mendocino Food Policy Council, CA Food Policy Council, David Martinez – Winnemen Wintu Community Activist, Anna Marie Stenberg – Mendocino Community Activist, Cornelia Reynolds – Noyo Food Forest Executive Director,

(Not Pictured: Kate Frey – Sustainable Gardens, Co – Author of “Bee Friendly Gardens”, John Schaeffer – President and Founder Real Goods, and Michael Thiele – Gaia Bees.

After our introductions, which included a delicious local honey tasting,  3 main areas of focus were identified.

  1. Policy on pesticide use in Mendocino County. Address the use of Round Up and neonics.
  2. Education/Public Awareness of the plight of bees in Mendocino County.
  3. Planting and providing forage for pollinators and bees in Mendocino County.

At our next meeting we will be defining what we want to accomplish, how to do it, and the desired outcome.

John Schaffer from Real Goods will host the next Bee Bold Advisory Committee Meeting in March.

We are extremely grateful to everyone who came and is willing to work towards a better future for the bees in Mendocino County!

Bee Bold Mendo“Evolution isn’t random.  We all work together.  The act of working together IS the evolution. Cooperation between us accelerates  development of each species.  The way we hold and support ourselves and each other advances our shared evolution”                               The Song of Increase

For current news and developments of Bee Bold in Mendocino visit www.facebook.com/beeboldmendo . 

If you want to participate please call Lavender Cinnamon 707 964-0118 ext. 250 or email me at lavender@thanksgivingcoffee.com

 

The story of Pony Express: Thanksgiving Coffee’s high caffeine coffee

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Back in 1978 (that’s thirty eight years ago) I was just beginning to learn about coffee. I spent the first six years getting comfortable with the fire and heat it took to convert it from a tasteless seed into a toasted reddish brown carrier of comforting flavor.

Paul Katzeff, Co-Founder &CEOThen I turned my focus to understanding the botany and chemistry of this magical “bean.” One of the first things I wanted to know was what made my coffee so much better then every canned coffee on the shelf.

Back then, a one pound can of Folgers or Martinson’s cost one dollar. My coffee, packed in a clear bag, closed with a twist tie at the top, was $3.50 per pound. I wondered, how could those big coffee companies turn out coffee at such a low price?

Back then there was not a lot of intellectual conversation about coffee in print or on the web. (There was no web, the closest thing to it was The Encyclopedia Britannica.) Coffee was an unsophisticated cup of Joe and not much more. There were no “to go” cups. You didn’t see people walking in the streets, or driving cars with cups of coffee in there hand. Cars didn’t have cup holders yet. Cane sugar found its greatest use in coffee and there was no such thing as corn syrup in packaged foods. It was a simpler time, a time before craft beer, and when people smoked in restaurants.

My investigation led me to Robusta coffee vs. Arabica Coffee.

Back then Every coffee company said their coffee was “Mountain Grown,” an indication that it was High Quality with “Deep, Rich” flavor. But it was pretty much a lie. The canned coffee was basically the lowest grades of coffee they could put into the mouths of unsuspecting and gullible American consumers. The truth was that the major portion of the canned coffee blends was coffee from a variety called Robusta, and Robusta was really cheap coffee with a rough, leathery flavor with wood notes and an ashy dry finish. But it had a heavy body and packed a punch that my coffee did not come close to.

So what was going on here? I was roasting Arabicas, and they were blending in Robustas with their Arabica’s to lower their cost. Robusta was all about volume and price. Arabica was all about flavor. The difference between Specialty Coffee and the 300 year history of coffee leading up to 1978 was the focus on Arabica varieties and the disdain for the Robusta variety.

The botany of these two varieties was very different. Although a raw coffee bean is known to have over 1600 chemical compounds, we tend to define coffee by its caffeine content. (Did you know coffee is 20% coffee oil by weight?) I learned that Robusta varieties have 2.5 -3 times the caffeine as Arabica varieties. I learned that caffeine is a waste product of photosynthesis and is stored in the plant only because the plant, unlike the animal kingdom, can not get rid of its waste. So there it is. And being water soluble, it is not destroyed by the high heat of roasting, and comes out into the cup when coffee is brewed.

So why do these two varieties produce such different levels of Caffeine?

To get to the answer you need to know that the two varieties do best in different environments. The Robusta variety likes the lowlands where the sun is hot, the air is heavy and moist, and the ground is rich in alluvial soils. The Arabica variety loves the cool dryer climates of the high country between 3,000-6,000 ft above sea level. Here the soils are young, with a very thin layer of topsoil, the ground is cool and the forest shade trees are essential for the light sensitive leaves of the Arabica tree.

Photosynthesis is the process by which the plant takes in sunlight (energy) and along with the soils nutrients and water, converts these assets into food. In this case, into coffee berries which contain two seeds and a whole lot of sweet juicy pulp that surrounds them. The seeds are the way the plants reproduces itself, and in the two different environments that these varieties call home, the seeds wind up with different amounts of Carbohydrates (food) and Caffeine (waste). Why?

Germination risk is the reason. The tree evolved to maximize its chances for survival.

When a coffee tree drops its berries at the end of a growing season, it wants the seeds to have a high success rate, meaning it wants its seeds to germinate. In the case of the Arabica variety, high up the mountainside, the conditions for germination and young seedling survival are slim. The soil is dry and cool , and the rainy season is six months after the seeds are ripe and fall from the tree to the ground. The tree knows that it might be a while for the conditions to become perfect. So it prepares the seed by being very efficient with its photosynthesis.

It produces more food and less waste for each seed. High carbs for the long wait and for energy for sprouting under difficult conditions. The Robusta tree does not waste its energy on producing a lot of carbs for the seed’s germination energy because it knows that the soil is warm and moist, and that the nutrients are there in the soil to feed the plant in its sprouting stage. Why waste energy on producing long chain, complex carbohydrates? So the energy goes into the production of Caffeine.

I like to think of the Robusta as a Buick that will operate without being highly tuned and the Arabica tree as a Ferrari that will not run unless it is highly tuned.

Hardy Robusta – Fragile Arabica. Arabicas taste better because they have the need to put food in the seed. That food is a complex starch that under high heat, breaks down into simple sugars which caramelize and produce the flavor of coffee. Robusta has starch to convert to sugar in the roasting process and thus, it is less sweet. Now, caffeine being one of nature’s most bitter substances, adds a distinguishing bitterness to coffee- and 3 times more in Robusta. Arabica coffees have less caffeine, and more carbohydrates so it is sweeter and less bitter. The major negative in Robusta, Caffeine, becomes a positive when you forget the flavor and use it for the speedy pick-up that its caffeine gives the drinker.

In 1978 Thanksgiving Coffee Company introduced Pony Express, “The Jackhammer of Coffee,” the start your day with a “Blastoff” drink.

It is natures natural five-hour power shot. It will make your heart race, it will keep you on your toes, and if you want to stay awake, you will stay awake!

Today, Robusta coffees are quite a bit more flavorful, mostly because the way coffee has evolved over the past 35 years. Flavor counts for value, and value means higher price. When I first created Pony Express, the flavor was metallic with a petroleum aftertaste. It was rough and not to satisfying. Today, our Robusta comes from places like Cambodia, Thailand, and the Philippines. It is clean and has a flavor that will take you back to a time when coffee was “Just a cup of Joe”, but this time, you might just develop a taste for it and never look back.

    – Paul Katzeff


 

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Pony Express

DARK ROAST • HIGH CAFFEINE

$13.50

BUY NOW

Thanksgiving Coffee becomes a Certified B Corporation!

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In 2015, Thanksgiving Coffee became a B Corporation, joining a global community of  socially and environmentally progressive businesses.

What’s a B Corp?

bcorpB Corps are leading a global movement of people using business as force for good. They use the power of business to solve social and environmental problems. B Corps are for-profit companies certified by the nonprofit B Lab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.

Today, there is a growing community of more than 1,550 B Corporations   42 Countries   130 Industries   1 Unifying Goal: to redefine success in business.

Why did we become a B Corp?

Thanksgiving Coffee has been a longtime advocate of sustainable business practices. We pride ourselves on our long standing work with farmers at origin, investing in social justice and environmental projects, Fair Trade and Organic and biodynamic coffee growing methods. We constantly evaluate our decisions based on their social and environmental impact. B Corp certification seemed like a logical step for us, to join others who operate under these same principles .

We first looked into B Corp Certification because we felt the community reflected our company values, and because we wanted to formalize our membership in the socially and environmentally progressive business community. It’s a simple way of expressing our values to our staff, customers, partners and suppliers. We’re proud to be a part of this movement.

B Corp is to business what Fair Trade certification or USDA Organic certification is to coffee. Inc Magazine calls B Corp “the highest standard in socially responsible business.”

Our Score

To become certified, we underwent the B Impact Assessment.  This is conducted by B Lab, a 501(c)3 nonprofit that serves a global movement, “People using Business as a Force for Good.”  The assessment shows how a company performs against dozens of best practices on employee, community, and environmental impact.  

Once our score was reached, we can then compare and learn how to improve the way we conduct our business for the future.  This was a great opportunity to see how we stand and where to set our goals on where we want to be.

The second component to this is our company’s legal status, ensuring that we can justifiably incorporate social and environmental values into our business decisions without risking legal action from our shareholders.  This is done by becoming a Benefit Corporation and changing the articles of incorporation.

Finally, we made it official by signing the
B Corp Declaration of Interdependence:

Thanksgiving Coffee 2015 B Corp Report

We envision a global economy that uses business as a force for good.

This economy is comprised of a new type of corporation – the B Corporation – Which is purpose-driven and creates benefit for all stakeholders, not just shareholders.

As B Corporations and leaders of this emerging economy, we believe:

– That we must be the change we seek in the world.
– That all business ought to be conducted as if people & place mattered.
– That, through their products, practices, and profits, businesses should aspire to do no harm & benefit all.
– To do so requires that we act with the understanding that we are each dependent upon another & thus responsible for each other & future generations.

View our full 2015 impact report

We won’t stop here. We’ll continue to make strides to improve scores where they’re less than the median, and maintain our practices that are already high. After 2 years, we’ll need to re-certify and prove that we’re still worthy of B Corp status.

Join us in the B Corp movement

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1. Celebrate Change Makers – Watch stories about other B Corp members
2. Do Something – Spread awareness, recruit a B Corp or take the free B Impact Assessment
3. Buy Responsibly – Take a deeper look at the products you buy

Our 1st #BeeBold Event

Thanksgiving Coffee Company has created Bee Bold Coffee, made a commitment to our bees, and is ready to share it with Mendocino.

Jonah and Paul Katzeff at the Bee Bold Booth

In October, Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op (UNF) had their grand re-opening. After 39 years they remodeled their store, and we thought it a perfect time to introduce Bee Bold Mendocino, a local movement to save the bees.  So Paul Katzeff, Co-Founder & CEO (pictured in the middle), Jonah Katzeff Vice President (below right) , and myself, Lavender Cinnamon, Community Development (below left), all went to UNF to represent Thanksgiving Coffee and share our commitment to the bees.

Bee Bold Mendo 1st EventBee Bold Mendocino came about when Friends Of the Earth (FOE) asked Paul for a donation.  He offered instead to create a source of ongoing support for their environmental work. As the partnership began to take shape they said, “help us fund our Bee Bold project “. Paul did just that and created  #Bee Bold Coffee. The project went straight to his heart, and so did the bees.  (link)

When I joined Thanksgiving Coffee Company this past year, this partnership with FOE was just taking flight, and it took hold of my heart as well.  It has instilled in me a deeper understanding for this delicate balance of life that we all share, and inspired me to become a steward of the bees.  “Everything the bees do is about relationship with one another.  The story of colony collapse is a story of how the relationships have been broken, contaminated, or subverted.  It is a story of ignorance, thoughtlessness and selfishness- qualities we humans bring to far too many of our relationships, from the most personal and intimate, to the most global and insitutional” Jacqueline Freeman – The Song of Increase (link)

There are many factors at play regarding the health of the bees, however the three main reasons for the decline in the bee populations are; systemic pesticides – neonicotinoids, malnutrition, and disease/mites.  The latter being a result of the first two; if your system is poisoned and not properly nourished, your susceptibility to disease is drastically increased. (link)  This is what modern farming practices are doing to the health of the pollinators. If we do not learn from this now and change the way we relate to our food, we will not have healthy food left to eat. The simple truth is, do not poison the land, do not poison the water, use the plants as medicine, and grow healthy nourishing food.

As an advocate for Mendocino’s bees, Thanksgiving Coffee Company is committed to educate, gather support from our community, and create an advisory committee to pass a local ordinance that will ban these neonicotinoids (bee killing pesticides) within Mendocino County.   This is why we said “yes” to be a part of Ukiah Natural’s event. This is why Thanksgiving Coffee joined the movement to help save the bee population, and this is how Bee Bold Mendocino was created. (link)

Jonathan and Elliot Local Bee Keepers

There is no way to do this alone. We need to work with the knowledge of those who are already engaged with bees and pollinators.   So, we reached out to the community to join us, and we had a wonderful response that included; 2 local bee keepers, 2 farmers, and a table set up to create your own pollinator seed balls.

Our beekeepers came from inland and the coast. Jonathan Hunt (on left) is part of the 4-H bee keeping program in Ukiah.  He contacted me and said he would love to come participate.  He brought with him his delightful enthusiasm and knowledge of bee keeping, as well as some wild crafted seeds he had collected for people to take and plant.

Elliot Brooks (on right) came with a top bar hive, he had built himself, and his entire bee keeping gear.  He also brought some of the honeycomb from his hive that the bees had made for people to see, and touch the magic of bees wax.  It was an absolute delight to spend the day with them.

With the help of UNF a table was set up for people to come, get their hands dirty, and help create pollinator seed balls. These pollinator balls included: clay, fertilizer and native wild seeds.  They are a way to help provide the necessary diversity of food sources the bees need for optimum health. Once you made the seed balls, you could to take them home for your own yard, or throw them into an open field or empty yard.

Hands in the seeds and dirtThis idea for the pollinator seed ball table came from Tiffany at FOE when asked for suggestions on how to engage children into the wonderful world of bees.  We all thought this was a great way to offer a hands on experience .

These seed bombs originate as a fun and friendly tactic for “guerrilla gardeners” to throw balls of seeds and fertilizer into fenced-off spaces that are otherwise neglected, or land in zoning limbo. We wanted to offer something for people to take home that can make an immediate difference.  It was wonderful to see the hands of so many people making the seed balls, knowing that they will offer a great food source to our bees.

Speaking of dirt and seeds, Tim Ward joined us.  He  works as Director of Fundraising and Programming at the Grange Farm School. Grange Farm School logoI came across their website when I was doing research on  different organizations in Mendocino County we would like to help and to promote their work. It was very exciting to discover this school right here in Willits dedicated to “improve agricultural literacy, food security, and ecological stewardship in our community and beyond.”  I love how they teach someone to be a complete farmer, taking into consideration all of the skills one needs to be a sustainable food producer. (link)

The School began in 2014 and operates on 12 acres of the Ridgewood Ranch, and is supported by a wide network across the region, state, nation, and world!

The Farm School recognizes the immediate need to train the next generation of farmers to support themselves, with a focus on production and distribution methods that emphasize long-term environmental responsibility.

The School builds on the rich agricultural heritage of Mendocino County and the Grange in its diverse and holistic educational programming for farmers, aspiring farmers, and youth. The Grange has been dedicated to serving the cooperative farming movement since 1867!  And yes, the Grange Farm School cares for our bees, and cooperation, which is an amazing skill the bees teach.

We would be remiss if we did not have representation from the wineries.  Mendocino County has over 17,000 acres of vineyards. It is essential that we help educate the vineyards and those who buy wine to the importance of the bees, even if grapes themselves are wind pollinated.   Today 25% of Mendocino vineyards are growing certified organic grapes, with the Frey family’s winery being the first Organic winery in Mendocino County, and the Nation, back in 1980.   If your wine is not organic, please ask if the winery uses neonicotinoids on the grapes.  Help educate the wine industry on how to help keep our pollinators alive.Jess Arnsteen & Erin Ravin-Parducci

We had the pleasure of Mendocino County’s oldest winery joining us,
Parducci Wine Cellars (Certified organic).  They understand the value and benefit of the bees. Jess Arnsteen came with Erin Ravin to share their organic, pollinator friendly practices.  Parducci was the first carbon neutral winery in the country (2007) and in recognition of their continuing dedication to social responsibility and environmentally sound practices, they received California’s highest environmental award, the Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Award.  They are also leaders in water reclamation and water-conservation program.

Jess works as Manager of Edible Ecosystems where he tends his flock of sheep, and a 15-acre garden that feeds over 60 employees from Parducci .  Jess is very involved with the chain of pollinator to food, he understands the importance of our pollinators and came with arms full of pollinator food/flowers to share with us. (link)

The entire event was a true pleasure, from the collaboration with Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op, who have been one of our loyal customers for over 38 years.  It just felt like home.

Pictured here is Mary Anne Cox, Ukiah Natural’s Marketing Manager (on right) she was a real treasure to work with, and Lori Rosenburg (on left) Ukiah Natural’s General Manager was a wonderful host.  We were graciously welcomed by the entire crew from UNF.

“Ukiah Natural Foods Co-op was incorporated in 1976. By serving the needs of our diverse membership, we have grown through the years.  Our current store has more than 6,800 square feet of space, and we serve over a thousand shoppers each day.”

It seemed only natural to introduce our #Bee Bold Coffee at their re-opening event, as we work together towards the health of our community and our bees in Mendocino. If you are in Ukiah go on in, say hi, and pick up some of the #Bee Bold Coffee in their store.

NoyoOur most recent and exciting news since this event, is that Noyo Food Forest has joined us as the fiscal sponsor for Bee Bold Mendocino.

The Noyo Food Forest is a non-profit that grows community, as they say “one garden at a time”.  They teach the value, and satisfaction of growing one’s own food, while giving support to local food sovereignty and independence. We are extremely grateful to Noyo Food Forest for all of their wonderful work.  (link).

 

I leave you with one more quote from The Song of Increase.

“Evolution isn’t random.  We all work together.  The act of working together IS the evolution. Cooperation between us accelerates  development of each species.  The way we hold and support ourselves and each other advances our shared evolution”

For current news and developments of Bee Bold in Mendocino you can visit www.facebook.com/beeboldmendo

If you want to participate please call Lavender Cinnamon 707 964-0118 ext. 250 or email me at lavender@thanksgivingcoffee.com

 

Latest Arrival: 100% Rwanda

1Dukunde

100% Rwanda

100% Rwanda

Sweet, with notes of dark chocolate, juicy hints of orange and plum.

MEDIUM ROAST • Fair Trade
$16.50

Buy 100% Rwanda coffee

 

Draped like a patchwork quilt over a steep winding ridge, the two thousand farms of the Dukunde Kawa Cooperative stretch over 10 kilometers of meandering hilltops and slopes. Each small farm is home to a family, and on their small plots, often an acre or less in size, the family produces beans, potatoes, plantains, and the economic lifeblood of their community, coffee. This community of farmers—collectively known as Musasa after the area’s main town—produces one of the most elegant coffees in the world.

 

We have worked closely with Dukunde Kawa since 2004 on a variety of social, economic, and environmental projects aimed at improving the quality of the farmers’ coffee and strengthening the cooperative and the benefits it offers to its members.

 

CR_2015_92_300dpi-1-300x300In 2015, we submitted this fine coffee to the team at CoffeeReview.com. They gave our 100% Rwanda single origin coffee a respectable score of 92 points:
“Immaculately sweet; lyrical. Peach, honey, lavender and honeysuckle, fresh-cut cedar in aroma and cup. Sweet, high-toned acidity; lightly syrupy mouthfeel. Peach, honey and flowers carry into a crisply sweet finish.” – rating by CoffeeReview.com  

 

100% Rwanda

100% Rwanda

Sweet, with notes of dark chocolate, juicy hints of orange and plum.

MEDIUM ROAST • Fair Trade
$16.50

Buy 100% Rwanda coffee

In Memory of Fernando Amador

In memoriam: Fernando Arguello Amador (1945 — 2015)

Fernando Arguello Amador

Fernando was a campesino (farmer) who became a friend over the many years we worked together. He was ever present in supporting his cooperative and community. He maintained an extremely high quality standard for his coffee.

Most of all, we will remember him as a strong diplomatic leader who stood up for the interests of the farmers he represented. Fernando had a huge heart, penetrating smile, and soft voice. He was incredibly respectful while driving a hard bargain. When he stopped being president he continued to support and use his experience to help the cooperative. He will be sadly missed on our trips up into the Aranjuez mountains, but his memory will always be with us.

– Nicholas Hoskyns
Thanksgiving Coffee Board Member & ETICO Managing Director


 

We’ve set aside a small amount of Fernando’s last coffee crop (2015) for a limited release. Our roastmaster, Jacob Long has created a special roast of this coffee, and we’re offering 100 bags. We’ll donate $1.00 per package sold to the Amador family in memory of Fernando.

Limited Release: Fernando Amador

 

LIMITED RELEASE: Fernando Amador

LIGHT ROAST
Silky-smooth, notes of milk chocolate, with a lingering navel orange sweetness.

$16.00

Buy Now

 


 

About Fernando Amador:

Fernando Arguello Amador

Fernando Arguello Amador was born in La Libertad, Nicaragua in the region of Chontales in 1945. His father was a silicon miner, and became ill with Tuberculosis. His family learned of a TB hospital in Aranjuez, so the family moved there for his treatment. When his father died 2 years later, Fernando, being the oldest child, stayed in Aranjuez to help his mother.

Fernando – “I sold bread and food door to door. I spent 5 years working in the hospital, first cleaning, then I learned carpentry to repair shoes. Later a woman offered me credit to buy 10 manzanas of land (17.4 acres). Little by little we started with coffee, then with the help of God we got a cow.”

 

Fernando had a rough start to farming, losing much of his first farm because he couldn’t make the payments.

But he persisted, and eventually secured a loan to plant coffee trees on more land. In 1992, Fernando and other farmers formed a cooperative, SOLIDARIDAD, which eventually became Fair Trade Certified, guaranteeing higher prices per pound of coffee grown by its members. It was around this time when Paul Katzeff, Thanksgiving Coffee’s co-founder, met Fernando and began buying his coffee.

Fernando's Coffee Seedlings“Coffee means everything. “[It] is what gives us security. It pays for all of our big expenses- the house, any sicknesses, clothing. I’ve raised my kids with it, given them education, constructed this house. With the help of the Thanksgiving Coffee Company, I bought the truck and that changed our lives,” said Fernando.

The better price has helped each member of every producing family. It allows us to help out in the community, with the school, and the church,” said Fernando.

In his years of experience as a cooperative member, Fernando gained wisdom about working in the cooperative model.

Casa Amador
“It’s a good way for a group of friends to get together to help the community. But for it to function well, you have to put aside your ego.

Don’t mix the personal with the professional, so that it is a cooperative in the true sense of the word. Virtue means that position and power don’t change you,” he said.

 

Over the years, Fernando saw his community, and the environment change drastically.

With development, come more challenges. There are more people than ever living in Aranjuez, which mean more roads, more traffic, and large-scale agriculture by foreign companies and investors.

“The down side is that a lot of the environment has been destroyed. There has been tremendous deforestation here. On the other hand, the small-scale producers have planted some 100,000 trees. We all have desire for the area to stay as beautiful as it is.”

Amparo AmadorFernando and his wife, Amparo, raised five children together. He liked to say, proudly, that all of his children have graduated high school, and are pursuing their passions.

“Leonelia (33) is a nurse, Alan (30) is a photographer, Iris (30) is a member of a women’s collective, Fernando (26) is a coffee producer (26) and Ontoniel (22) is studying engineering at the university in Leon, Nicaragua,” said Fernando.

 

Thanksgiving Coffee has partnered with Fernando and Cooperativa Solidaridad for over 20 years, and built a strong, collaborative relationship.

Over the years we’ve worked together to increase the quality of the coffee by investing in washing stations, building cupping labs, and providing feedback to the farmers on their crops each year. It’s a relationship we’re proud of.

Fernando in Coffee Trees

“The best coffee, it takes a lot of work, carefulness, and dedication. The coffee has to be picked at the right moment, de-pulped the same day with clean machinery, perfectly fermented, and rinsed with clean water.”

– Fernando Arguello Amador (1945 – 2015)

For Fernando, coffee meant everything.

 

Latest Arrival: 100% Peru

100% Peru Coffee - CENFROCAFE

High in the lush mountains of northern Peru, two thousand family farmers produce coffee under the dense shade of guavas, acacias, orange, and banana trees. These farmers are members of CENFROCAFE, an association of over 80 small cooperatives working together to produce one of the finest coffees in Peru, while stewarding the surrounding mountain ecosystem.

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Members of CENFROCAFE

100% Peru Coffee

100% Peru

Delicate honey-toned sweetness, juicy citric acidity, subtle chocolate notes, and hints of ripe papaya.

Fair Trade • Organic
$15.50

Buy 100% Peru coffee

 

The province of Cajamarca has long been the backbone of Peru’s economy due to its vast mineral wealth. Unfortunately, these days, modern mining techniques despoil the earth and surrounding rivers and forests. The cultivation of high quality organic coffee has become the key to Cajamarca’s economic and environmental sustainability, and the farmers of CENFROCAFE are leaders in this effort.

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Photos from CENFROCAFE

The members of CENFROCAFE carefully pick ripe cherries, depulp, ferment, wash and dry their coffee on their small farms ranging in size from one to three acres. The result is a finely crafted coffee with hints of honey, papaya, and milk chocolate complimented by a soft citric acidity.

Roastmaster Jacob Long

Roastmaster Jacob Long

Our roastmaster, Jacob Long, shared his thoughts about the 2015 crop:

“The Peruvian Coffee we received this year is nice and sweet. Right now the beans are fresh and vibrant. It’s one of our favorite single origins at the moment.

People who typically don’t appreciate light roasts might like this coffee more than others – the acidity is more smooth and juicy than bright. When I taste this coffee, the smooth milk chocolate notes really come through.”

 

 

100% Peru Coffee

100% Peru

Delicate honey-toned sweetness, juicy citric acidity, subtle chocolate notes, and hints of ripe papaya.

Fair Trade • Organic
$15.50

Buy 100% Peru coffee

Ethiopia (washed) – 92 points

Coffee Review - Ethiopia Yirgacheffe

 

 

 

 

re-posted from CoffeeReview.com

Blind Assessment:
Delicately bright, exhilarating. Candied lemon, vanilla, pear, baker’s chocolate in aroma and cup. Gentle, lively acidity; light, satiny mouthfeel. Lemon and crisp chocolate carry into a sweet, lightly flavor-saturated finish.

Notes:
This coffee is certified organically grown and Fair Trade Certified, meaning it was purchased from small-holding farmers at a “fair” or economically sustainable price. This coffee was produced by farmers in the Worka Cooperative, currently representing 305 members. Southern Ethiopia coffees like this one are produced from traditional Ethiopian varieties of Arabica long grown in the region. It was processed by the wet or washed method (fruit skin and pulp are removed before drying). Ethiopia coffees processed with this method typically express great aromatic complexity and intensity, with a particular emphasis on floral notes.

Who Should Drink It: Those who value gently bright coffees, delicate, aromatic, pure.

Read the full review on CoffeeReview.com

 

Latest Arrival Notes: Ethiopia Yirgacheffe

Ethiopia Yirgacheffe

Deep and immaculately sweet, with notes of ripe cherry and golden raisin.

Ethiopia is known as the birthplace of Arabica coffee. Centuries of production and perfecting methods of preparation have produced brilliant results. This fine Ethiopia Yirgacheffe coffee is sourced from family-owned farms organized around the Worka Cooperative located in the southern district of Gedeb, Ethiopia. The Worka zone encompasses the highest altitude coffee cultivation area in the entire country of Ethiopia, resulting in a stunningly unique flavor profile.

The Worka Cooperative was established in 2005 and currently has approximately 300 members. In 2005, the cooperative joined the Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union (YCFCU) to support a sustainable coffee supply from cooperatives in the Gedeo ethnic region of Ethiopia.

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CR_2015_92_featured-150x150This coffee was recently reviewed by Ken Davids and the team at CoffeeReview.com!

“92 points – Delicately bright, exhilarating. Candied lemon, vanilla, pear, baker’s chocolate in aroma and cup. Gentle, lively acidity; light, satiny mouthfeel. Lemon and crisp chocolate carry into a sweet, lightly flavor-saturated finish.”

– CoffeeReview.com

Read the review

Ethiopia (natural) – 91 points

Ethi Natural

 

 

 

 

re-posted from CoffeeReview.com

Blind Assessment:
Richly fruity and cidery. Baker’s chocolate, apple cider, wisteria-like flowers, a brightening hint of grapefruit in aroma and cup. Resonant, roundly tart acidity; lightly syrupy mouthfeel.

Notes:
This coffee is certified organically grown and Fair Trade Certified, meaning it was purchased from small-holding farmers at a “fair” or economically sustainable price. It was produced by the Banko Gotitit Cooperative, established in 2012 and currently representing 300 members. Southern Ethiopia coffees like this one are produced from traditional Ethiopian varieties of Arabica long grown in the region. This is a “natural” or dry-processed version, meaning the beans were dried inside the fruit, encouraging a flavor profile that is less predictable and deeper than the more familiar wet-processed floral- and citrus-toned southern Ethiopia profile.

Who Should Drink It:
Those who enjoy the subtle, complexly sweet ferment and lush flowers of the more rustic style of dried-in-the-fruit or “natural” coffees.

Read the full review on CoffeeReview.com

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